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Five Strategies to Effectively Use Online Resources in Emergency Medicine

      For health professions learners of all levels, staying abreast of the literature can seem like an insurmountable task as the number of clinically oriented articles continues to grow at an increasing rate.

      Priem J. MEDLINE literature growth chart. jasonpriem.org. 2010. Available at: http://jasonpriem.org/2010/10/medline-literature-growth-chart/. Accessed March 15, 2014.

      • Larsen P.O.
      • von Ins M.
      The rate of growth in scientific publication and the decline in coverage provided by Science Citation Index.
      Fortunately, there has been a veritable explosion of online secondary resources that endeavor to digest the expanding medical literature and present it in a format that is optimized for adult learners. Particularly in emergency medicine, these resources have been dubbed “free open access medical education,” also known as free open access meducation (FOAM).
      • Nickson C.P.
      • Cadogan M.D.
      Free open access medical education (FOAM) for the emergency physician.
      The FOAM movement has figured prominently in the proliferation of blogs and podcasts made available online by practicing clinicians.
      • Nickson C.P.
      • Cadogan M.D.
      Free open access medical education (FOAM) for the emergency physician.
      • Cadogan M.
      • Thoma B.
      • Chan T.M.
      • et al.
      Free open access meducation (FOAM): the rise of emergency medicine and critical care blogs and podcasts (2002-2013).
      As an unintended consequence, learners must now contend with an exponentially expanding library of both primary literature and secondary online resources.
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