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Commentary: Reducing Teen Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities: Do Parents Hold the Key?

      After a night of drinking, a teenager in our community got into a car driven by another impaired teen. He was not wearing his seat belt and was killed when the car struck a telephone pole and he was partially ejected from the vehicle. On another unfortunate night, 2 local teenage girls were killed when their car rolled over on a dark, winding road during a rainstorm. The crash was attributed to speed, inexperience, and poor road conditions. These tragedies are not unique to our trauma center or our community and illustrate many of the problems that need to be addressed to reduce the number of motor vehicle crash fatalities among young drivers: inexperience, distraction, driving under the influence, and lack of seat belt use.
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      Linked Article

      • Traffic Safety Facts, 2010 Data: Young Drivers
        Annals of Emergency MedicineVol. 64Issue 4
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          [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic safety facts, 2010 data: young drivers. Ann Emerg Med. 2014;64:413.]
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      • Correction
        Annals of Emergency MedicineVol. 64Issue 6
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          In the October 2014 issue, regarding the NHTSA Notes commentary (“Reducing Teen Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities, Do Parents Hold the Key?” pages 413-415), a coauthor’s name, Michael J. Mello, MD, was inadvertently omitted. We apologize for the error.
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