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Commentary: Road Traffic Injury: We’ve Come a Long Way, But Not Far Enough

      Motor vehicle crashes are a routine part of our modern lives. We know they’re going to happen, so we design cars to protect our bodies better, we carry insurance to help protect us financially, and we design our roadways to help mitigate damage from crashes. Our local news radio stations carry traffic reports highlighting the current crashes; by that metric, perhaps things are improving because my local station now broadcasts traffic reports every 10 minutes instead of every 6. Our emergency medical services (EMS) systems owe their foundation and initial support to motor vehicle crashes, as do our trauma systems. Why are things this way, however? How did we get to the point at which our society accepts that people are going to be injured and killed every day on our roads? Why is it that 90 deaths a day on our roadways is something that most people rarely think about, whereas we worry about the safety of flying on commercial airlines, which experienced a total of 265 fatalities during the entire course of 2013?

      Ranter H. Airliner accident fatalities at record low. Aviation Safety Network. Available at: http://news.aviation-safety.net/2014/01/01/aviation-safety-network-airliner-accident-fatalities-at-record-low/. Accessed June 1, 2015.

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      References

      1. Ranter H. Airliner accident fatalities at record low. Aviation Safety Network. Available at: http://news.aviation-safety.net/2014/01/01/aviation-safety-network-airliner-accident-fatalities-at-record-low/. Accessed June 1, 2015.

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