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Commentary

      Sepsis continues to carry a high mortality, ranging from 28% to 50%,
      • Angus D.C.
      • Linde-Zwirble W.T.
      • Lidicker J.
      • et al.
      Epidemiology of sepsis in the United States: analysis of incidence, outcome, and associated costs of care.
      and thus has become one of the most important areas of focus for improving care.
      • Dellinger R.P.
      • Levy M.M.
      • Rhodes A.
      • et al.
      Surviving Sepsis Campaign: international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock: 2012.
      Much of the focus on sepsis is on early recognition and treatment. This places the greatest responsibility on health care providers within the ED because 79.4% of patients in this report were classified as having sepsis onset outside of the hospital. From 1994 to 2009, sepsis accounted for 260,000 ED visits per year.
      • Filbin M.R.
      • Arias S.A.
      • Camargo C.A.
      • et al.
      Sepsis visits and antibiotic utilization in US emergency departments.
      With increasing ED boarding times and hospitals reaching volume capacities, patients with sepsis and septic shock are often cared for in the ED for longer periods. This CDC report
      • Novosad S.A.
      • Sapiano M.R.
      • Grigg C.
      • et al.
      Vital signs: epidemiology of sepsis: prevalence of health care factors and opportunities for prevention.
      outlines important data on epidemiologic features and pathogen spectrum that can assist emergency physicians in addressing the challenges of sepsis recognition and care.
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      References

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        • et al.
        Epidemiology of sepsis in the United States: analysis of incidence, outcome, and associated costs of care.
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